You think you’re working hard enough

I just had the most eye-opening experience meeting up with Toya DeLazy today. We’ve been going back and forth on social media and it was time to meet up and discuss music. The session went well, but what stood out for me was her work ethic and attitude.

 

She arrived with her manager who greeted me with a smile and a handshake. She introduced herself and let me know politely that they had a pretty tight schedule for the day. We had our session and had a short dialog after. After talking to them I realise why Toya is so successful.

 

She doesn’t waste time

There are so many of us who complain that there isn’t enough time to put music together. We talk about how difficult life situations are and we condemn ourselves before we’ve given our music a chance. She had a full schedule for the day and it involved meetings as well as rehearsals. One might argue that it’s her job fulltime and that’s how it should be, but I say that if you want to make music a fulltime hustle then you have to treat it as such even if you already have a fulltime job. Work on your emails during your lunchbreak instead of gossiping with colleagues, listen to insightful podcasts to and from work to spark new ideas and work on music the moment your essential commitments have been completed each evening. It’s not complicated; what you put in is what you’ll get out. If you can’t make time for your craft it will never develop regardless of how talented you are.

 

Her manager is on her A-game

I did a post about needing a manager and I mentioned that it isn’t necessary until you have something to manage. Toya has plenty to manage and therefore she requires a manager to do what she can’t. From our short interaction I deduced that her manager is very supportive, she knows what she is doing and she looks like she holds her part of the ship together quite well. She allows for creative freedom, but also has a good idea of what Toya needs to do based on her experience in the music industry. People are always looking for a good manager, but I say that this is nonsense. If an artist can build themselves up independently then a good manager will eventually seek them out.

 

They’re super humble and go about their business

Attitude is so important. First encounters can be quick and first impressions can happen so fast. If you aren’t aware of your attitude you can really mess up a really good situation. Half the reason I typed up this article is because I had such a good experience with them. Remember that remaining humble and quiet about your next move is a really good way to go about your business because you’re less likely to eat your words when things go wrong and you’ll flourish when things go well.

 

Keep motivated and stay inspired,

SB

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